Drawing Practice: Linework Exercise

This is my go-to drawing practice when I’m wanting to improve my linework skills, warm up before working on a project, or want to get back into drawing after a break. This practice helps develop control and consistency by focusing on drawing circles and lines in patterns.

I picked up this exercise when I was looking for ways to improve my drawing skills after being frustrated that I hadn’t improved after drawing for a while. One thing I noticed about my illustrations was that my lines didn’t flow the way I wanted them too. I was also discouraged because I didn’t know what to draw and was getting tired of looking for a subject to study without feeling inspired.

This practice helped by giving me something to draw without the expectations that it would have to look like a specific subject, while also allowing me to practice building my linework skills.

I usually recommend this exercise to all my students when they’re wanting to improve their drawing skills. I like to think of this as a stretch or gentle job before a big run, it’s something to warm up the hand and mind without the pressure of full-performance. One of the ways I notice myself and others struggle with drawing and illustration is when we expect to have a finished “perfect” drawing immediately. When something doesn’t look like what we’re expecting to see, that discouragement can make us put down the pencils and not want to pick them up again.

This exercise creates a respite from that expectation, so we can be present with the practice and appreciate what we can do rather than what we struggle to achieve.

This isn’t a magic exercise, though. To become skilled at drawing and illustration, you’ll still need to practice drawing different subjects from references and your imagination. This exercise is a way to prepare for that work.

Art v Artist 2021

2021 for me has been a year of transition, change, and work. In this year, I started teaching adult and youth art classes for local organizations, I took on freelance design work and hustled to build connections with local and national organizations I found myself aligned with. Really, in 2021, I took on the artistic project of being the independent artist I set out to become last year. I have been really fortunate to be able to focus on this work; this project of being allowed me to connect with my creative and collaborative goals and communities in new ways, for which I am ever so grateful.

I’m looking back now at the year through the art I’ve made, to check in with how I have grown as an artist in 2021.

Colored Pencils, Acrylics & Classes

I did A LOT of teaching this year, which has been so incredible and an invaluable way for me to grow as an artist. I can’t say more without first thanking all of my students for taking my classes and learning with me. When I get down to the obvious question: did my art improve this year? I have to say, yes, it absolutely did. My technical skill, expression and composition all improved dramatically in 2021, perhaps more than within any other year, EVER. That is completely due to the constant practice I had with my teaching schedule.

To prepare for my classes, I explored different subjects, techniques with media and paid closer attention to my practice, all of which reinforces what I’ve long suspected: the best way to learn is to teach.

I started working with colored pencils a few years ago, but it wasn’t until I was teaching colored pencils class that I really dug into why this medium is so special and what can be achieved with it. My color theory and line work have exploded, and these days I’m achieving rich dimensions in my illustrations that I wasn’t seeing last year.

Teaching a watercolor and acrylics class also challenged me to revisit media that I knew I liked, but had forgotten that I loved. Working on a lotus with my class inspired the lotuses I’ve started painting using different lighting and background techniques.

Themes: Ladies & Plants

I’ve always had themes in art that I’m compelled to create. Women and fantasy elements (fairies, dragons, mermaids) are my typical favorite subjects. As I pulled together the montage for this year, I generally knew the pieces I wanted to use, specifically the lotuses and #PlantPerson illustrations that I really loved creating. This year, my sense of why I’m drawn to fantasy themes really clarified for me. As a child (and definitely still as an adult) I loved reading fairy tales and watching Disney movies. Something that I struggled with, though, was [not] seeing myself in those stories, and feeling like I wasn’t sure I could belong in them, which was totally heartbreaking. The #PlantPerson series (ongoing) is a way for me to create the narratives and images I wanted to see as a child, combined with a fascination with plants.

Plants are quite fantastical already; if you think about it, they eat light and live within a space time that is both the same and wholly different from our own! They’re really the magical spirits/ fairies from fantasy, except real and if I’m careful and attentive, I can keep them in my home and admire them anytime I want!

In my latest illustration, I Paint Sparkles (2021) I feature two of my own houseplants – my own Strobilanthes dyerianus and my partner’s Dracaena trifasciata. I’m also building on a theme that I started last year, one I call “dark haired girl with a black bird” and also “horned woman with black cat”, which was the first illustration I finished this year.

This lastest illustration, I Paint Sparkles, was cognitively difficult for me, as I used colored pencils to create the bird, cat and girl, I found myself exaggerating features and getting really dark. I felt self-concious about my art being “not pretty”. So much of the fantasy art I like to look at is a continuation of the images I loved as a child: airy, svelte, and fair. I still love those images, but I end up back in the same struggle I experienced as a child: where’s the earthy, dark and rounded characters? Where’s me? I almost abandonned this painting a few times, wanting to turn away from it and try again to make something more gentle and fairy-like. But as I worked on this piece, I started reading and doing a lot of research about Frida Kahlo (for a super exciting upcoming project!). Kahlo’s work is of course powerful and beautiful. It’s moving and it doesn’t look anything like the images I struggled with as a child and now. I still want to find a way to bring these two aesthetics together, with tension, but also in a sort of discordant harmony.

Something to work on in the next year.

Looking Back to Look Forward

This is only my second year creating a retrospective of the year through art (see 2020s’s Art v. Artist here), and it’s already really fascinating to see how things change and what stays the same. I sure do love black birds, cats and fantasy elements, but branching out (LOL!) into plant illustration is a wonderful new addition. I’m ending 2021 in a much different attitude than I was in at the end of 2020. I’m much more optimistic about what’s ahead: new projects, new residencies, new trips planned. In 2022, I’m launching a whole new endeavor with my arts business that I’m excited to share with folks soon. For those subscribed to my Patreon, you’ll be getting an advanced look at what I’ve been working on in the next few weeks. Plus, I’m thrilled to start administrating the Corvallis Arts Walk and be closely involved with my local arts community!

Thanks so much for everyone who has supported my creative adventures so far, and for checking out the artwork and sharing yours!

Cheers to a happy new year in 2022!

Community Art for Relationship Building

I’m taking a look back at the community art projects I led over the past year with a couple of my favorite community organizations, and I’d like to share some of my tips for planning and developing art projects for community groups.

I approach community art projects differently from my classes in schools or with small groups, although the goals are similar: access to art practices and materials, engaging creative processes and building relationships.

In the case of community arts, I focus mainly on relationship building, letting the art project be a foundation for coming together, like a family meal or celebration, but with paint! For me, this shift in focus means that I want to keep the art projects open-ended and low-risk so that participants can engage with the projects based on their own comfort and skill level and focus on relating to the others around them, sharing ideas and creating space to be together, virtually or in-person. These projects are open for any level of engagement so that if someone wants to really dig into the project, they can be there right alongside another person who just wants to sit back and observe how others work with the materials. There’s actually room for anyone in these creative spaces.

With relationship building in mind, I focus on specific elements when selecting materials and methods for community art projects:

  • Accessible materials – something we have in abundance or can be easily collected and shared.
  • Open-ended instructions – I like a project that can be done in 3 – 5 steps, maximum, with the option to build on a practice or explore materials more.
  • Time-investment accessibility – these projects should be something someone can do in 2 minutes, but could also spend 20 minutes or 2 hours, if they wanted.

And, since this is a relationship-building experience, I try to consider basic needs as part of the art project: how will folks arrive to the project (transportation); will there be food/ resources available for them; are the spaces physically accessible, safe and comfortable; are the instructions and plans for the project accessible (consider spoken or reading language, understanding pictorial instructions).

In 2021, I had monthly art projects between a few different groups, coordinated with a couple of local nonprofit organizations. Here are a few standouts that were really fun and some of the planning that went into them:


Pour Painting at Jackson Street Youth Services
– Space for Learning Together

Community art projects are often great opportunities to experiment with new artistic practices for me. Since I focus on togetherness and exploration rather than mastery of materials or skills, I can try out practices that I don’t have a lot of experience with already and help set the tone for trying something new. This has been a way for me to learn new skills and lean into curiosity with art materials while also enjoying community building. Pour Painting/ flow acrylics was exactly that kind of experience for me. By practicing this with Jackson Street Youth Services– a local nonprofit serving youth in the community with safe shelter, case management, and community enrichment– I was able to join in with the community in experimenting and learning about an art form I’ve long been curious to try!

I did research ahead of time and tried out my own paintings before bringing materials to the group, but by the time we had our afternoon class in the summer of 2021, I had probably only made 1 or 2 paintings myself.

I knew enough to set up the project and make suggestions to the participants, but I was also able to keep back too many suggestions and allow participants to experiment freely.

Materials for Pour Painting

  • Flow acrylic paints in various colors
  • Flow acrylic medium
  • Small dixie cups
  • Stir sticks
  • Canvas panels of various sizes (8″x8″ and 4″x4″)
  • Painter’s tape
  • Silicone oil
  • Gloves
  • Aluminum baking trays and lids (like for a turkey)
  • Plastic table cover
  • Foam brushes

Set up & Tips

  • Individual spots: I set up each spot with a baking tray or lid, and showed participants how to turn dixie cups upside down to prop up their canvas panels (this allows the paint to flow down over the panel and into the tray)
  • Priming the canvas: The paint pours more evenly if there is a layer of wet paint on the canvas first, so I showed participants how to use the foam brushes to paint the canvases with a thick layer of paint before pouring.
  • Mixing flow medium with paint: I started out by showing participants how to mix the flow medium with the paints in the dixie cups, using a 3:1 ratio medium to paint (or whatever the instructions on the paints/ medium suggested).
  • Mixing colors: I had several different colors, including the typical blue, red, yellow, white and black. If participants wanted a color we didn’t have, I showed them how to mix paints together in the dixie cups BEFORE adding the pouring medium.
  • OR! Participants could mix up separate colors with pouring medium and then pour different colors+medium into one cup to create a marbled effect.

Group Painting at Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center
– Opportunities to Grow in Relationship

The CMLC is a special organization to me, and one that I am quite honored to serve as a board member (at the time of this writing, I’m the new board chair). The work of this organization is about sharing educational and community resources for folks arriving to Corvallis from outside of the US. As a university town, we do tend to see a lot of international students and their families, but our organization also supports folks who are arriving to Corvallis for permanent residence and to pursue citizenship.

As I became a new board member this summer, I was in good company with other new members and staff at the organization. I wanted to get to know the people who were also invested in the organization and to also share my interests in community building through creativity by hosting a group paint session.

I set up this group paint event to focus on sharing creative space with one another, and for the opportunity to connect and talk with each other. For that reason, I specifically avoided a more standard paint with me tutorial, and instead brought a bunch of paints, canvases, brushes and music and while I made suggestions for how to approach the project, I didn’t lead the participants in creating anything specific. I simply guided us all in selecting color, brush, and putting paint onto the canvas.

This was a bit riskier for being the most loose-form project, and the lack of structure for some folks did create discomfort and confusion. But I’m not sure that I’d change any of that. In hindsight, I would prime the community more with discussion about staying present rather than focusing on what something “should” look like. This was an eye-opening experience for me and the community participants and I’m so grateful for the experience.

Materials for Group Painting

  • Four 6-ft tables
  • Chairs
  • Table covers
  • Wooden easels, offered to each participant
  • Acrylic paints in red, blue, yellow, black, white, gold, pink, teal, purple, plus modeling paste, glazing medium, and iridescent medium
  • Brushes of various sizes and shapes
  • Stretched and panel canvas of various sizes
  • Plastic tubs (like yogurt or hummus containers) for water
  • Pencils
  • Plastic-coated paper plates
  • Rags

Set up & Tips

  • The Round Table: All the tables were actually rectangular, but I set them up in ao open rectangle so folks could all see each other and chat. With our group of about 14 people, that meant three or so to a table. Outdoors and with space to move around and everyone vaccinated (and COVID infection rates low for the summer), we felt comfortable enough to take off our masks and see each other.
  • Setting a tone: Being outside in the shade was a nice touch, plus having music from a portable speaker that create atmosphere but didn’t compete with conversation helped create a celebratory tone, like a community meal, except with paint.
  • A variety of possibilities: I made some suggestions to pick colors that jumped out at folks as they surveyed their options, with the intent to encourage leaning into instinct and trusting themselves with the process. This was uncomfortable for some folks, who perhaps already felt vulnerable with art-making. As a community educator, I have the privilege to help people push their comforts and try new things, as well as help them to see possibilities in that trying.
  • Showcasing special materials: I did bring along modeling paste, glazing medium, and iridescent medium. Throughout the session, I introduced those separate mediums whenever someone asked about them or there had been some time for folks to settle into what they had begun to make. This meant announcing to the group that a material was available to them, and if they’d like to try it, there were a couple of ways I was familiar with the material, but they could try it out themselves. The sparkly stuff was, of course, the most popular.

Glass Painting at Jackson Street Youth Services
– Observing Each Other’s Skills and Experience

Part of my volunteering with Jackson Street this year was offering enrichment activities for the mentorship program. It was a real joy for me to spend time with the mentors and mentees in this program, and get to see their relationships come together.

This faux stained glass project turned out to be a really cool way for the groups to share their interests and skills with each other. The set up was classic: basic materials and process with enough possibility that participants could dig deep into the project.

The finished pieces came out looking so cool, and there were so many instances of genuine astonishment and joy at what each person could create with dark lines and glass paint (and it makes me want to add glass paint to my personal collection for sure!)

One of the challenges of hosting monthly art sessions is to come up with enough interesting and different subjects and practices for participants. As an illustrator, sure, I could spend all day everyday drawing, and that’s great if the goal of the art practice is to develop skill and style. But in community arts, that’s emphatically NOT the goal. Focusing on skill has the chance to create a split between who’s “good” at art and everyone else, which in the best of circumstances becomes one or two people making gorgeous art and everyone else watching. The worst outcome would be some of those spectators feel discouraged about trying the project. For community arts, I want to hold space for all participants with any skill level to share their exploration with each other. This is why unique and surprising projects can be perfect, like this faux stained glass project. Although there was linework and painting involved in the process, there was enough adaptation for someone who hasn’t practiced those artistic skills to still create something unique and for those who did have that practice, to share their skills with others. It also wasn’t something anyone at the table had tried before (I did one practice the previous night), and so there was zero mastery at the table, just as I like it 🙂

Materials for Faux Stained Glass

  • Glass sheets (like from thrift store picture frames)
  • Black fabric/ puff paint
  • Black Sharpie
  • Glass paint in various colors
  • Paint brushes
  • Paper
  • Optional (suggested): outline drawings of flowers, mandalas, shapes printed on paper

Process

  1. Draw a design on a piece of paper that can fit inside the area of the glass sheet, or select shapes and drawings that are printed on paper.
  2. Place the drawing/ print under the glass.
  3. Use the sharpie to trace the drawing or outline onto the glass.
  4. Use the puff paint to paint the lines of the drawing. Allow to dry completely.
  5. Use glass paint to paint inside and around the puff paint lines.

Set up & Tips

  • An example is worth 1000 questions: I prepped the evening before the class by creating an example at home. I also prepped some glass sheets with basic lotus and star designs with the puff paint so they would be dry and ready to paint for the class.
  • Note: the drying time of the puff paint was about 45 minutes, which for the 90 minute session means that participants were able to sketch out their designs and trace with puff paint and then color with the glass paint in the same session, which was cool.
  • Opportunities to work together: Some of the glass we had, which we took out of old picture frames from the thrift store, were various sizes, and one was quite large. For that one, the pair that used it created something together using this method, which was actually really neat to see and made a very unique keepsake for that pair.

Family Art Classes at Corvallis Multicultural Literacy Center
– Building Community

In an on-going collaboration with the CMLC, I’ve been hosting family classes for community members to create together at the center. As our global community continues to grapple with the effects of living during a pandemic, staying safe and building connection can feel like they are at odds.

Mediating between those choices are our obligations as community leaders and educators.

For these family art programs, I have been working alongside the CMLC program coordinator to plan for safety and health and maximum engagement. Good communication and planning has helped us successfully bring folks together.

Working closely with staff and volunteers for community projects has been essential. Together, we have covered as many possible questions and scenarios as we can to make sure we put safety and health above all. Our art projects have been a way to invite community members back into space with each other, while observing cautions for safety.

The first project we made together was decorating masks, both papier mache masks (which I had for a different project that was disrupted by COVID issues earlier in the year), and cloth face masks. This project brought us together into the center to share creative ideas and also practice healthfulness with sanitation and observing social distancing.

For our second project, we made posters and stickers, which is simple but honestly my favorite thing (yay stickers!). This second project was more focused on being together and exploring the space and opportunities the center offered.

Part of each of our activities has been to offer snacks to the young children, which is a matter of principle for me as a community educator. It’s another way for us to highlight the resources available at the CMLC. For our pandemic-friendly snacks, we offer a perusal of our packaged snack closet for kids to select from.

Materials for Mask Decorating

  • Papier mache masks
  • Cloth masks for adults and children
  • Fabric markers
  • Coloring markers (keep separate)
  • Glitter glue (the superior form of glitter)

Materials for Posters and Sticker making

  • Poster board paper
  • Sticker sheets (I used the kind for die cut machines)
  • Markers
  • Pencils
  • Glitter glue (love this stuff)

Set up & Tips

  • Room enough: A challenge at the CMLC is to make physical space for participants and observe social distancing. We manage this by separating participants into different rooms with the same supplies and a volunteer or staff in each room.
  • Keep it simple sweetie: These projects are so simple, they’re really drawing and coloring. And because of this, parents who attend the sessions with their children can chat and meet each other, which children can be imaginative and have freedom to create.

As a community arts educator, my work is focused on bringing folks together over creative projects, with an artistic perspective and methodology. I’ve learned from my experiences with organizations like The Center for Artistic Activism and Theatre of the Oppressed NYC about approaching opportunities for learning and conversation with an artistic framework, which is confronting challenges and taking on new opportunities to learn new skills and see from others’ perspectives. Looking back on the creative projects I’ve been a part of over the year, I’m struck by how naturally art and creativity became sources of community building, and our collaboration was affected by careful consideration of the particular challenges and desire for connection and growth our participants experienced.

In 2022, I’m looking forward to a new year of collaboration with these and other local and national organizations. Are you a community educator? How do you engage your community through arts and creativity? I’d love to hear about what other folks are doing to bring communities together!

Lane Arts Design Apprenticeship 2021

This winter, I joined Lane Arts Council as a design mentor for Lane County youth. I had the privilege to work with four amazing teens in the Eugene area, discussing design work, personal expression, and market design strategies. We were definitely not without challenges in this project; our group met entirely virtually and we had to compete with our own hectict school and work schedules to prioritize our collaborative process. Through the experience, I aimed to mentor the youth with experience-based guidance in creative collaboration work, as we focused on a final presentation that wrapped up last Friday at the Eugene First Friday Artwalk.

The students came up with the focus of our project while I supported with facilitation and helping them determine objectives and deadlines.

Their focus was to create a fashion line that helped wearers express personal identities. In this work, we talked about the different ways folks identify themselves– everything from “food consumer” to “go-with-the-flower” and (my personal favorite) “challenger”. This conversation turned out to be a great way for us to get to know each other and begin developing genuine connections.

We also talked about the reasons for design work: for functionality, aethetics and communication. Being entirely virtual, we had the benefit to look around our own spaces and discuss the design of objects we interact with daily, creating comparissons between the different focuses in the designs of objects including utilitarian (functionality) to pure expression (aesthetics) to message-making (communication).

As our project clarified, the student designers focused on how to design fashion and accessories to tap into identity niches, which we dived into, fully imagining who our target fashion wearers would be and what their lives would be like.

Students designed sketches and drafts based on aesthetics and functionality for the target markets. They then worked with each others’ designs to create accessories and characters that captured those aesthetics plus ways to communicate to target markets about the designs created (marketing communication).

For the final presentation, we printed boards and stickers and students talked about their work with art walkers at Spark Labs during Eugene’s First Friday Artwalk. The stickers were super popular and really showed off the students’ work in graphic design to communicate style and person expression through aesthetics.

Interested in the Lane Arts Council Design Arts Apprenticeship program? Learn more about it here on their website: lanearts.org/arts-apprenticeships/


Student Presentations and Artist Statements

Artist Statement: Amelia

What is your design?  My design is the logo(s) for the fashion brand Lovebun. The logos shown are for the brand itself and three of its fashion lines. 

Who is your design for? Lovebun’s clothing and accessories are meant for young teens to adults so they can express what they feel makes them unique, whether it’s their aesthetic or their gender/sexual identity. Lovebun is “for everyone and anyone.” The people who are most expected to purchase from Lovebun are ‘alt’ teens who spend their time on tiktok or other social media and enjoy the products of similar brands. 

What was your experience like in this class?  Stressful at times due to school and other activities getting in my way, but overall it was a fun and great learning opportunity for me. I’d recommend it to others who want to step foot into a possibly new experience or want to learn what it may be like to go into a professional arts career. 🙂

Artist Statement: Lizzie

Describe your design: I drew 4 models with clothes I designed myself based on Harujuku streetwear. I also drew multiple mascot characters depicting different styles I’ve seen at school and on the internet. 

Who is your design for? I based my designs around people I’ve seen around school and on the internet. I tried to recreate styles directed toward girls around 14-17 years of age. These people want to express their style and personality through bold, cutesy fashion.

What was your experience like in this program? I had a good experience. I liked seeing everyone’s different art styles. It did get a little stressful when I tried to take on too much work, but I’m happy with my results.

Artist Statement: Joyce

My brand is called Esteem by Eve, and it is made for women who needs confidence. It is a formal attire, high fashioned one piece dress, perhaps worn with gold earrings and bag with gold chains. The clothing brand is targeting women 20-40 who needs to wear formal attire in work or events such as performances or exhibitions

Little Painting, Big Message

This year, I participated in The Arts Center’s annual Arts Alive! event with a chill little paint-with-me video that I was pretty into.

Grab some paints, a brush or two and set your mind to something you want to say (to yourself or, heck to the world!). Don’t worry about it being perfect, just sink into the process and chill with me.

Plus! Super cool extra thing: you can get the kit we made for this video so you (or someone you think could use some creative time) paint with the same materials I used at home! Make your own little garden of encouraging/ rebellious messages by getting your kit at my Arts & Crafts shop on Etsy: Art Kit – Little Painting/ Big Message (materials are SUPER limited!)

We’re going to the market!

This month I’m going to bring my artwork and crafts to the Autumn Fest Art Show in Newport, OR! I am SO JAZZED about this, I can’t even calm down and haven’t been able to for weeks, alternating between really enthused and totally overwhelmed on a regular cycle.

This will be my FIRST artist market/ bazaar ever as an independent artist. Sure, I’ve been to tons of fairs and markets before, as a shopper and as a tabler, and always that for organizations I’ve worked for, or as a volunteer hosting kids activities and doing outreach. But this time, I’ll be showing off my art; I’ll get to see how folks react to my artwork LIVE, which, yes is quite intimidating, but I”m excited.

I really love markets, and these past couple of years, I’ve missed them terribly! A friend of mine (Alexandra Schaefers, another Oregon artist) told me about Autum Fest and I practically jumped on the registration form. Since signing up, I’ve been working on desiging my booth and creating inventory to show off. I might have gotten a little over-excited as I’ve been discovering new crafts and arts I want to try out and possibly make to sell at the market.

In addition to the original paintings and illustrations, prints, cards, and stickers, I’ll also offer up my hand-bound sketchbooks (new covers and re-bound covers) and jewelry. This has been an awesome opportunity to explore my interests and really organize my work for my online shop and local shops, too. One of the most fun parts of this market prep has also been working on figuring out my aesthetic and desiging my table and booth display, and these days I’m going with dark-forest-planty-craft-good-witch-who-likes-to-make-pretty-necklaces. That’s a thing, right?

If you’re in the area, please come check out the Autumn Fest Art Show in Newport on November 13, 10-4 pm. If you’re not in the area, you can follow me on Instagram for pics from the fair, plus notices on updates to the Etsy shop!

Draw with me Livestream FAIL!

Well, that was a fun experiment! My livestream today for the Corvallis Arts Walk was DOA, the whole thing: frozen vid, bad audio… that’s it, I guess, but that’s still like EVERYTHING in a livestream.

But, the best thing about failures is the chance to learn! So I’ll work on my set up, figure out the bugs and the bats and then come back next month (?) with a new video or stream.

If you came here looking for my stream, thank you so much! ❤ I’m an independent artist/ educator/ designer, and that means my whole thing is all independently run. Your support in the fact you even clicked over here is amazing and so very much appreciated!

Please check out the other (working-ish) videos on my channel, and follow me on Instagram for updates. If you’re feeling REALLY into it, you could also sign up for my newsletter or even check out my Patreon.

❤
Jen

We be Art Walkin

The Corvallis Arts Walk is back! It’s been a good amount of work and creative thinking, but I’m super proud to announce that we’re ready for ambulatory arts tomorrow (Thursday, September 16, 2021) 4:00 – 8:00 pm (check out the map and online gallery here).

The CAW was started in 2015 by local artists here in Corvallis. The walk highlights the people and places that make this community creative and it’s been a thrill to be part of the team that’s bringing it back from the brink after the global pandemic put everything on hold.

We don’t have all the answers, that’s for sure, and we know things will likely change again (and again), but we’re working on our collective agility and resiliency, starting out with this first comeback walk as a hybrid virtual and in-person event (with strong encouragement that all artists, galleries and walkers observe social distancing and wear masks to help keep folks safe and healthy.)

I’m going to be stretching my streaming legs with a Draw with Me Livestream during the event from 4-6 pm on my YouTube Channel.

This artwalk COULD NOT HAPPEN without the hardwork and perseverance of artists who are dedicated to community arts, especially Eileen Hinckle, Wanda Buck, and Jennifer Moreland from the Downtown Corvallis Association.

Check out all the artists and spaces on the CAW website at corvallisartswalk.com
If you’re in town, doing the walk, maybe I’ll see you as I go around taking pictures after my stream!

Fiesta Cultural: Celebrate & Create Craft Kits

This year I got to be part of the Eugene First Friday Artwalk by creating a take home craft kit to hand out at the Lane Arts Council table!

For a whole week, my apartment was a full-on art kit production space while I handmade paperclay scuptures, filled paint pot strips and added a few of my favorite artsy treats, too.

Check out the video below for a peak into the kit, plus some chill painting.

These art kits were made special for the event, but I’ll be putting up more kits in the Arts & Crafts shop soon!

Haulie, the Hollerin’ Crane

My friends and I made a giant puppet crane and then took it to the circus.

This is the life of an artist.

And yes, I’m serious, a GIANT crane puppet, which my friend animated by being entirely inside it, and walking around backwards. And apparently, being larger than a human might not actually be all that GIANT for a crane because ours is based on the Whooping Crane, which can grow to 5 feet tall. So our 9 foot monstrosity is still really big, but is is giant?

Why did we do this, you may be wondering… That’s a very good question!

Before Haulie grew her wings
Continue reading “Haulie, the Hollerin’ Crane”