Fantasy Landscape Gouache Painting @ Common Fields

Let’s make some fantasy landscape paintings in gouache at Common Fields!

This Fall, we’ll make dazzling, colorful and fantastical landscapes at Common Fields. Perfect for beginners, small groups, teens and adults, this workshop includes everything you need to start making fantasy landscapes with gouache!

Come join us on Monday, November 7, 2022 at 6:00 pm
at Common Fields in downtown Corvallis

In this 2-hour workshop, we’ll practice with gouache, a water-soluble paint, to create illustrative landscapes to inspire stories, and fantasy. References, paint, paper and equipment are all included.

No painting or drawing experience needed for this laid back art making night!

Food and bevergaes are available at the locallyowned food carts at Common Fields.

This painting workshop is open to beginners and experienced painters, teens and adults. Registration is $25 per person
All materials provided and included.

Fantasy Landscape Painting with Gouache at Common Fields Registration

Gouache Class at OCCC Fall 2022

Create whimsical illustrations and paintings with gouache, a water-based medium that layers like acrylic and dries with a matte finish. Perfect for children’s illustrations, cards, and small paintings, this medium can bring to life all kinds of wondrous imaginings. Beginner-friendly class with live instruction on materials and techniques. Students can expect to end the class with at least 2 finished paintings. Materials list provided; materials are available from instructor (includes material fee).

Materials list provided; materials available from instructor (includes material fee)

Class Schedule:

October 20 – November 10 (4 weeks)
Thursdays
10:00 – 11:30 am

Registration fee: $xx
Materials fee: $25
Register at Oregon Coast Community College (coming soon)

Watercolor class at OCCC Fall 2022

Students will learn and practice skills in watercolor painting. We’ll practice using different tools and techniques to create layering effects for depth in subjects inspired by nature, and we’ll focus on skills for painting outdoors or in a travel journal. Over the 4 weeks, we’ll add techniques to build up to one or two final paintings, per student’s choice. Class studio time includes group reflection and instructor support and feedback to improve skills. Materials list provided; materials are available from instructor (includes material fee).

Materials list provided; materials available from instructor (includes material fee)

Class Schedule:

September 22 – October 13 (4 weeks)
Thursdays
10:00 – 11:30 am

Register at Oregon Coast Community College

Gouache Workshop at Greenhouse Coffee + Plants

Paint with texture and color in this beginner-friendly gouache workshop at Greenhouse Coffee + Plants with Jen Hernandez Art. Be inspired by the lush plants and decor around you as you practice techniques in nature painting and illustration with gouache. Gouache is a water-based opaque paint that allows for smooth blending and layering of color to create vibrant and dimensional detailed artwork.

In this workshop, you’ll have everything you need to create illustrative artwork of plants and fungi.

Friday, October 14, 2022
Register at Greenhouse Coffee + Plants
Registration: $65

Bespoke Bookbinding II at OCCC Fall 2022

More bookbinding for beginners! We’ll practice 4 more bookbinding techniques including binding with old book covers, star books, long stitch, and decorative spines bookbinding. No previous experience needed (no need to have taken Bespoke Bookbinding I).


Class Schedule and Registration:

October 20 – November 10
Thursdays, 1:00 – 2:30 pm

Register at Orgon Coast Community College


Materials

Special materials and equipment are required for this class (click to see materials list).

Bespoke Bookbinding at OCCC Fall 2022

Bookbinding for beginners: In this class we’ll practice 4 different bookbinding methods from around the world to create our own unique sketchbooks and journals. Each class will include step-by-step instructions for each method, and live demonstration by the instructor. Create a travel watercolor journal, a sketchbook with pockets, a personalized diary, plus gorgeous decorative binding. 

Plus, extra tips and instructions for single-page books and zines on the exclusive class website.

Special materials and equipment are required for this class.
See class info and materials sheet for supplies and links.

Class Schedule

September 22 – October 13 (4 weeks)
Thursdays
1:00 – 2:30 pm

Register at Oregon Coast Community College

Colored Pencils at LBCC Fall 2022

Explore the vibrant world of colored pencils in this class for all levels of artistic skill. Learn about techniques for blending colors, using solvents, and creating compositions based on references.

Practice skills that you can use to create landscapes, portraits, still life and more in this versatile medium, plus get practice in drawing skills with graphite pencil. Each week, live demonstrations will cover drawing exercises to warm up with, and then studio practice with real-time guidance and feedback.

No previous drawing experience necessary, this basics class will give you the starting ground to take off with your imagination..

See the class syllabus here

Class schedule:

September 27 – December 6
Tuesdays, 11:00 am – 12:20 pm
Virtual on Zoom (join from anywhere!)

Register at Linn-Benton Community College

Materials

Suggested supplies:   If you do not have some of these supplies at home, and it is difficult to get them you can get by with the materials you do have.

  • Wax-based (recommended) colored pencils (instructor will primarily use Prismacolor and Faber-Castell; Crayola/ Rose Art, other brands are welcome)
  • Colors: Prismacolor Premier 24 set 3597T plus, Cream (PC914), Cool Grey (PC1061), French Grey (PC1074)
  • Water-soluble colored pencils, any brand (instructor will use Crayola watercolor pencils, Derwent Graphitint, and Derwent Inktense)
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Tortillons
  • Drawing pencil (any of 2B, 4H, 6H)
  • Kneaded eraser
  • Mineral spirits (Gamsol)
  • Small watercolor brush
  • X-Acto Knife
  • Inexpensive watercolor paper pad (9×12 or 11 x 14) (such as Strathmore or Canson)
  • Black and/or toned paper
  • Optional: tissue, cotton swab, paper towel (can substitute for tortillon)
  • Optional: Carbon transfer paper and tracing paper

Ink Illustrations at LBCC Fall 2022

Create illustrations for books, comics, cards and fine arts with inking techniques to express drama. Practice sketching, linework, stippling, shading and scumbling with one or more pens to create effects of depth and movement. This class is perfect for beginners who want to develop illustration skills or combine ink illustrations with other media like watercolor for journals.

September 27 – November 15, 2022 (8 weeks)

Register at Linn-Benton Community College

Already registered? Click here to access the student page (password protected)

Coptic Stitch Bookbinding

Materials

  • 1 cardboard backed sketch paper pad, 9″ x 12″ (see prep notes above)
  • 3 sheets decorative scrapbook paper
  • Embroidery thread
  • Beeswax (recommended)
  • Awl
  • Washi tape
  • 50% glue/water solution
  • glue brush
  • Tapestry needle or curved bookbinder’s needle (recommended)
  • Ribbon or cordage for closure (optional)

Preparing the cover

You can make a cover for a sketchbook or journal from a basic sketchpad.

Step 1: Remove the binding from the paper pad. You can use a spiral bound pad or a glued pad. Hang on to everything, you can use all these pieces for the finished sketchbook.

Step 2: Use the cardboard back as the cover. Trim it down to the dimensions you want your final sketchbook to be. For this example, I’ll make a sketchbook that is 6″ wide by 9″ tall when closed. I trim down the cardboard back to two rectangles that are 6″x9″ (one for the front cover and one for the back).

Step 3: Next, trim down the sheets of paper. For a 6″x9″ book, I trim the paper to 12″x 9″. Fold four sheets of paper together to make signatures that are 6″x9″. Use a bonefolder to crease the signatures.

Step 4: To create a decorative cover with scrapbook paper, trim the paper to 2 pieces 1″ wider and 1″ longer than the final size of the book and 2 pieces the same dimensions as the final size of the book.

For this example, I cut two pieces of paper to 7″x10″ for the outer covers, and two pieces to 6″x9″ for the endpaper/ inner cover.


Steps for Coptic Stitch

As you bind the coptic stitch, it might be helpful to always keep in mind going around the previous stitch. That going around anchors each stitch, and holds each signature or cover to the rest of the text block. Here are step-by-step photos to follow along with (click images to open them and see the captions).

Jump to:

Binding the first cover and signature:

  1. Hold the cover and the first signature together, making sure the binding holes in each line up.
    • I like to hold the signature and cover with the spine edge toward me so I can flip the signature open easily as I bind.
  2. Insert the needle into one of the binding holes at the ends, starting on the inside of the signature.
  3. Leave a 5″ tail inside the signature to help tie off the thread later.
  4. Pull the thread to the outside of the signature.
  1. Pull the thread around to the outside of the cover and pass the needle through the hole from the outside.
  2. Bring the needle between the cover and the signature.
    • The signature and the cover are both threaded, but still really loose.
  3. Pass the needle around the thread that’s going between the signature and the cover.
  1. Pass the needle back between the signature and the cover, and back out again, around the thread.
  2. Insert the needle back into the binding hole it came out of.
  3. Pull the thread tight (but not too tight to rip the paper!)
  4. Use a knot to tie off the thread with the tail you left inside the signature.
  5. Move on to the next binding hole, passing the thread out from inside the signature.

All of the binding holes in this first signature and cover are worked the same as the first.

  1. Pull the thread through the signature to the outside of the book.
  2. Insert the needle into the binding hole on the outside of the cover to pull the thread into the cover, between the cover and the signature.
  3. Pass the thread around the thread connecting the signature to the cover, toward the left.
  4. Hook the needle under that thread from the right and pull tightly.
  5. Insert the needle back into the same binding hole on the signature.

Repeat these steps for all of the binding holes on the first signature/ cover

  1. For the last binding hols in the signature, begin the same as the other holes, inserting the needle in the hole from the inside of the signature.
  2. Thread through the outside of the cover and wrap the thread around the stitch you’ve made to attach the cover and signature.
  3. Instead of inserting the thread back into the same binding hole, insert the needle into the first binding hole of the next signature.

Binding the rest of the signatures

For binding the rest of the signatures, you’ll continue to go around the previous stitch to hold the signatures together.

  1. After inserting your needle into the first hole in the signature, go immediately to the next binding hole.
  2. Pull the htread through the binding hole and to the outside of the signature.
  3. Insert the needle under the previous signature stitch (in this case, the stitch holding the first signature to the cover).
  4. Insert the needle back into the same binding hole it came out of.

To keep stitches neat like little knitted V’s, pass your needle under the stitch starting from the side of the stitch closest to the end you started from and insert the needl back into the same binding hole.

Adding the Back Cover and finishing

  1. When you reach the last hole on the last signature, tie a knot to bind off the thread.
  2. Pass the needle with the thread through the binding hole to the outside of the text block.
  3. Pull tightly to keep the thread straight.
  1. Place the unbound cover over the text block, lining up the binding holes. Pass the needle through the cover from the outside.
  2. Bring the needle and thread out between the signature and the cover to the outside of the spine.
  3. Hook the needle under the thread holding the cover to the signature.
  4. Insert the needle back into the same hole in the signature it originally came out of.

Bind the nest of the cover in the same way.

  1. From the inside of the signature, insert the needle into the next hole and thread through the signature to the outside of the text block.
  2. Insert the needle into the next binding hole on the cover.
  3. Bring the thread between the cover and the signature to the outside of the binding.
  4. Pass the needle under the theread connecting the cover and the signature.
  5. Insert the needle back into the same binding hole.
  6. When you get to the last binding hole, tie off the thread and tuck away any extra ends!

Monster Makers Camp Overview

In Summer 2021, I got to work with some creative minds at The Arts Center in Corvallis, OR, in a Monsters Maker 4-day camp for kids.

In this camp, students created their own creatures using illustration, image references, sculpting and making considerations for where and how the creatures might live and what physical adaptations the creatures would need to survive. This camp ignited so much creativity and inventiveness among the students and encouraged sharing ideas, inspiring each other and joining their imaginations. While our focus was mainly on using the sculpting tools and being creative with our stories about our creatures, this camp can be adapted to meet more rigorous science and biology standards for early education.

In this post, I’ll share my camp outline and some of the resources and discussion we used in this camp. This outline can be adapted to different ages, contexts and physical abilities.


Set up & Goals

Schedule: 4 days, 1.5 hours per day (6 hours total)
In-person

Ages: 6 – 13 years old (1st – 6th grade)
Note: since this was designed as a summer camp, I kept the ages pretty broad to accomodate families. As a school program, I would offer this for narrower age ranges (1st & 2nd grade, 3rd & 4th, etc.) and make changes to my discussion points and objectives for different age groups. Keeping the ages broad meant that my focus was more on the skills of art-making rather than being specific to science learning, although there’s lots of room for adaptation and change with this outline!

Camp overview/ learning objectives:
Students will:

  • Discuss habitats and physical adaptations of animals to exist in those habitats
  • Share their ideas with and respond to the ideas of their peers
  • Practice drawing skills with shapes and details
  • Work with polymer clay and special tools to create unique objects
  • Write about their creations as characters, developing a world for their character to occupy
  • Share their work and respond to the work of others

Materials & Equipment:

  • Sketchbook
  • Cardstock
  • Drawing and coloring materials
    • Pencils
    • Erasers
    • Waterproof pens – (Micron 12)
    • Markers
    • Colored pencils
  • Polymer clay (oven bake)
  • Clay tools
  • Polymer clay glaze
  • Paintbrush
  • Aluminum foil (full roll)
  • Adult only use: Toaster oven, safely plugged in and placed in well-ventilated area
  • Optional: findings for jewelry, key chains to turn figures into toys
  • Adult only use: Epoxy glue for broken pieces

Environmental Set up:

  • Tables and chairs for each student to sit or stand comfortably & safely while working and interacting with others
  • Access to bathroom/ hand washing stations
  • Materials and tools for each student (clay, clay tools, paper, drawing tools)
  • Table for educator to demonstrate, visible by all students, or the ability to walk around, if needed
  • Extra supplies nearby
  • Toaster oven easily monitored by adults, in a well-ventilated area, safely plugged in
  • Space for cooling sculptures after they are removed from the oven

Introductions & Agreements

In all of my classes/ residencies/ camps, I’ll start off with student introductions and an overview of the class. For youth classes, I’ll also work on agreements for the class, which I’ll write up and have available to look at and review for each of the class sessions.

  • Student Introductions: Say your name, pronouns, and choose one place to live: the boreal forest, the rainforest, the ocean, a city, the desert, the savanna, the tundra, or somewhere else (tell us)
    • Bonus (to engage student experience and ability): What is something you could teach the rest of us?
  • Class Agreements:
    (These agreements help set the tone for the class, and are a useful place to return to when things start to feel “off track” in a way that might leave some students behind.)
    • Try – some things we do might be new/uncomfortable/ difficult or even seem boring, and our job is to try our best as much as we can!
    • Non-judgemental language – When we look at each other’s artwork and share our own, let’s avoid words like “Good” “Bad” or “Like” and let’s think about what we can ask the artist about their work, what their work reminds us of, and if it’s our art, what we might want to change or try that’s different.
    • Share – Be willing to share your work so we can learn from each other and get new ideas!
    • Experiment – Try something different when you can, be curious about the materials, tools, and find different ways to use them or create something new!

Observations & Discussion

In this first day of the class, we looked at examples of ecosystems in our opening, starting off the conversation with an idea that we’ll be creating creatures that would exist in an environment they were adapted for (even if the creature and the environment were both imaginary). We look at examples of boreal forest, rainforest, ocean, cities, deserts, savanna and tundras and ask observational questions:

  • What do you notice about this environment?
  • What do you think a creature would need to live in this environment?
  • What else are you curious about this environment?

We also looked at examples of real-life animals and imaginary creatures. I brought a set of reference images for the class to look over and started our discussion again, this time encouraging students to use their sketchbooks to sketch out physical elements (ears, tails, horns, wings, etc.) from the animals that they were interested in or curious to explore more. Students were invited to pick an animal from the pictures on their desks (the students had different collections of images) and talk about their creature:

  • What is something you notice about this creature?
  • Where do you think this creature could live, and what physical elements do you think help it to be adapted to its environment?
  • What else are you curious about this creature?

Click here for Reference Image Set

Art Making Practice

I try to dive in immediately with art-making, since that’s really the hook of the class: students want to MAKE!

Drawing Practice

When students are working on drawing, it’s my goal as an arts educator to preserve the organic impulse to create immediately. I encourage students to look again at the references I’ve provided them, along with any of the sketches or doodles they’ve made so far. After 10 – 15 minutes of leaving space for students to explore, I’ll begin to make suggestions for approaching drawing practice, while also still preserving room for students to follow their own paths.

Start with basic shapes: using a reference as an example, I demonstrate how to find the most basic shape that’s similar to the biggest parts of the reference. For example, I’ll show an image of a bunny and how the body of the bunny is round like a circle, and start by drawing that, making adjustments with my pencil and eraser as I go. As I go over the different parts of the bunny, I’ll find more shapes and add those on top to make a bunny shape.

Next, I’ll start adding details like eyes and noses, and remind students that this is where we can get creative with different features and think about where our bunny-creature might live (add wings for an aerial bunny? a flexible tail for a tree-dwelling bunny? big scooping claws for an underground bunny?). This is a fun moment to invite students up to the demonstration drawing to add their own elements and talk about how this changes where the creature might live or what it might be able to do.

Students use their sketchbooks throughout the camp, referring back to doodles as they create with clay.

Polymer Clay Practice

On the first day, I try to also get clay into kids’ hands as soon as possible so they can start to experience this medium and imagine ways to use it right away. I’ll encourage them to explore the medium first, share any observations or questions about it with each other and also share some guidelines. These guidelines will be repeated throughout the entire camp, so I try not to take up too much space at first by trying to say everything all at once.

Observations:

  • The clay starts out hard when it comes from the package
  • Artists can warm it up and soften the clay with their hands by kneading it and smooshing it or using the roller (clay tool) to smooth it out. This is conditioning the clay
  • When we make something we want to keep, we’ll bake the clay in the oven. The clay will harden in the oven and stay that shape forever! But until we bake the clay, we can still change things about the creatures and objects we make.

Recommendations, Tool use

  • Use a small amount at a time
  • Figures can’t be too big or they won’t bake well – try to keep them to about palm-size
  • Don’t see the color you want? Try mixing colors together!
  • Like drawing, shape simple forms (balls, pyramids, cubes)
  • Use tools to attach with scoring
  • Use tools to smooth out finger prints
  • If clay feels sticky, allow it to cool on your foil
  • Things to consider with polymer clay: too thick, the clay might not cure evenly, too thin, the clay might be brittle and break easily when handling it
  • Details can be carved into the clay and then painted after being baked
  • Marbling colors is also a cool way to get effects
  • Wash hands before and after clay use
  • Polymer clay is not appropriate for food use

Demonstrating Techniques

One of the first projects I’ll demonstrate to the students is to make figures using balls and snakes: by creating large or small clay balls and pressing them together (this is a way to make the body shape of some creatures), or creating a long thing clay snake that can be coiled or twisted for cool effects (like making tails or horns).

I also demonstrate tool use to create details and to join pieces of clay together by first scoring the clay in the spots where they will be joined. This will prevent the pieces from falling apart after baking.

Sometimes that falling apart happens, anyway, and so having a small tube of epoxy glue to mend broken pieces was very useful.

For baking times, I follow the directions for the materials I use, making sure to bake in my toaster oven that’s specifically for polymer clay pieces (I got mine cheap off of a community board), and kept in a well-ventilated area. I also make sure to keep the students aware of the bake and cool down times so that they know they can look at their pieces but they won’t be able to touch them until they’re fully cooled.

Some students wanted to make necklaces and keychains with their clay pieces, so I helped them prep their pieces before baking by adding holes for jump rings that we could attach after baking.

World Building

While students create and have their pieces baked, I encourage them to write and draw their creature’s environment:

  • Where does it live
  • What does it eat
  • What does it usually surround itself with (treasure, tools, other creatures…)

Students can illustrate their scenes on cards that we fold to create backdrops for their creatures. I also encourage students to create character cards about their creatures, which includes information about the creature:

  • Creature’s name
  • Favorite food?
  • What’s its special abilities?
  • What is it afraid of?
  • What makes this creature unique?

As a special element of the class, I also created stickers for the students using their drawings and my die-cut machine at home.

Outcomes, Further Exploration & Adaptations

As the week went on, the students became more familiar with the tools and materials and created some amazing pieces. The depth of detail and imagination that went into their creations was truly impressive. This camp could have been adapted into a deeper exploration into ecosystems in which the students’ creations lived and worked alongside each other.

Accessibility adaptations to consider:

The motor skills of the student: for some students a softer clay like paper clay may be more accessible. Paperclay is definitely different from polymer clay, and it can be wetted with water to make it softer, as well as baked in the oven. The use of cookie cutters or molds to help shape clay is a great way to also increase accessibility, where students can use those to get started and then add details on top.

The smell and tactile feel of the clay should be considered and may be offensive to sensitive students.


This was such a fun camp in the summer, and it’s an outline I’m continuing to develop for my other residencies and classes for kids. If you’re an educator or artist and plan to use some of these ideas, tell me about it! I’d love to hear about any changes you make or challenges you come up with in your experience!


This camp was made by The Atelierista and shared openly to make arts education accessible to everyone! Educators, artists and students are encouraged to use this description to explore and learn more about creativity and art-making. If you like this and want to support The Atelierista (and get updates and exclusive content access), check out the Patreon page and consider becoming a member!